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Senior Airman Eric Contreras, a 86th Communications Squadron systems acquisitions technician, connects wires to new computers for imaging on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Aug. 3, 2017. The National Security Agency has directed all of the Department of Defense to make the transition to Microsoft Windows 10. The NSA directive puts all branches of the military on the same operating system for the first time ever. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Savannah L. Waters)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany (AFNS) — Every day the U.S. Air Force rallies in defense against enemy forces wishing to inflict harm, whether it’s through physical harm or via cyberattacks. As the advancement of technology expands, cyber security is more important than ever.

The National Security Agency has directed all of the Department of Defense to make the transition to Microsoft Windows 10. The NSA directive puts all branches of the military on the same operating system for the first time ever.

“The Air Force and DOD are always moving forward in cyber security … to protect us against cyberattacks and provide a better and more protected network,” said Staff Sgt. Christian Valdivia, the 86th Communications Squadron systems acquisitions supervisor.

Keeping up with the civilian enterprise has its challenges as the military fights for optimum security and for smooth communications between departments to de-conflict software issues.

“In the past, we couldn’t put Air Force on Army equipment down-range or vice versa due to software conflict,” Valdivia said. “The only solution then was re-imaging the computer and wiping them completely, but with Windows 10, we won’t have to do that.”

The 86th CS supports more than 24,000 network devices in the Client Systems Center, and they have a March 2018 deadline to ensure every computer in U.S. Air Forces in Europe migrates to Windows 10.

 

 

 

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