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Posts of category  "marines"

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The biggest challenge in filming a documentary about Marines for the giant screen wasn’t getting the breathless aerial shots of troops jumping from the back of aircraft or rappelling from mountainsides.

It was learning to work with leathernecks and their capricious and unpredictable training schedules, said Brad Ohlund, director of photography for the film.

Last week, the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, Virginia, christened its new giant-screen Medal of Honor Theater with the debut of “We, the Marines,” a 40-minute journey from boot camp to the Corps’ most rigorous and dynamic training locations across the country.

Shot almost entirely digitally, the film is visually sumptuous and constantly entertaining, with wide vistas and up-close views of the dirt, sweat, tears and snot that go into the making of a Marine.

The film was the result of years of work and proved a daunting task, Ohlund told Military.com at its premiere Saturday.

 

 

 

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Marines with 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, 2nd Marine Division continued construction on a fire-and-maneuver range at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Aug. 1, 2017.
The new range is designed for Marines to hone necessary skills needed for upcoming deployments and training exercises.
“This range has been repurposed a couple of times,” said Cpl. Micah Schnayerson, a construction shop clerk for 2nd CEB. “In the 1970s it was a bazooka range, a little after that it was a grenade range, and then a tank range.”
With the range no longer supporting tanks, 2nd Marine Division decided to repurpose the range allowing infantry units and engineers to practice their combat skills instead of having them travel to other duty stations across the United States to complete training.
“The overall value of this project is substantial,” said Bridger. “Instead of having Marines travel all the way across the country to Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, we’ll have something right here on Camp Lejeune.”

 

 

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A new device idea would have supplies at Marines’ fingertips, not on their backs.

One Marine staff sergeant is trying to bring wearable technology down to the fire team level with the hopes of streamlining logistics and having Marines carry only what they need, with “real-time” resupply a near future reality.

“The common problem is the warfighter is too heavy,” Staff Sgt. Alexander Long V said. “We spend a lot of money just trying to make the equipment lighter. Units still go out with three days of supplies even if they’re just walking a kilometer on patrol.”

Long is one of the Innovation Challenge winners from the event’s first year in 2016. His idea, the personal combat assistant and reporting device, or PCARD, is a wearable electronic device smaller than a playing card and about as thick as a thumb, and is months away from being in the hands of Marines.

The device has basic options such as food, water and ammunition that an individual fire team member can submit when they need more of any of those items. Squad leaders hold tablets, wirelessly connected to the smaller wearables.

The information is funneled up to the platoon commander, who can make supply decisions quickly as Marines move in the field through operations. That data is then collected at battalion and regimental levels, bringing decision-making up from operational to tactical to strategic levels.

Long is one of the Innovation Challenge winners from the event’s first year in 2016. His idea, the personal combat assistant and reporting device, or PCARD, is a wearable electronic device smaller than a playing card and about as thick as a thumb, and is months away from being in the hands of Marines.

The device has basic options such as food, water and ammunition that an individual fire team member can submit when they need more of any of those items. Squad leaders hold tablets, wirelessly connected to the smaller wearables.

The information is funneled up to the platoon commander, who can make supply decisions quickly as Marines move in the field through operations. That data is then collected at battalion and regimental levels, bringing decision-making up from operational to tactical to strategic levels.

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The Marine Corps will begin fielding a reinforced pack frame for their standard rucksacks as early as 2018 after reports of the current issue FILBE frames becoming brittle and snapping in cold weather.

Aug. 3 (UPI) — The Marine Corps will begin fielding a reinforced pack frame for their standard rucksacks as early as 2018 following reports of the current issue FILBE frames becoming brittle and snapping in cold weather.

The current frame has been fielded since 2011, but issues with its durability began surfacing in 2013 from the Marine School of Infantry – West. Further incidents with the frame breaking arose during airborne operations and mountain warfare training and exercises in Norway during the winter of 2015 and 2016.

The new frame is identical in form and how it attaches to the pack and the Marine, but is constructed using stronger materials.

The frame has already been tested by Marine Recon units during a variety of exercises, and will undergo further trials in sub-freezing weather where it will be checked for signs of stress and cracking after heavy use.

 

 

 

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The Japanese prefecture of Okinawa filed a new lawsuit against the government demanding a halt to construction work for the relocation of the US Futenma base, local media report. The relocation has been the target of protests among locals.

The prefectural authorities say that Tokyo is acting illegally without permission from the Okinawa governor, as seen in a copy of the lawsuit sent on Monday and obtained by the Okinawa Times.

 

 

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A Brooklyn woman has helped officials identify the remains of her uncle, a Marine in World War II, 74 years after he was killed — using her own DNA.

Nancy Lewis, of Bensonhurst, sent in her DNA sample 2¹/₂ years ago, hoping it could lead military officials to the remains of Pvt. Joseph C. Carbone — who was killed on Nov. 20, 1943, the first day of the Battle of Tarawa.

“Nobody thought of giving DNA, so I called and I asked them,” she told The Post. “I was like, ‘I’m still in shock’ . . . Oh my God, [my family] is all ecstatic about it.”

Carbone, who grew up on Gold Street in Brooklyn Heights, wanted to join the Marines when he was 17, but his mother wouldn’t allow it, his nephew Joseph Caramanica said. She finally let him go when he turned 18.

 

 

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The gravestone of Lance Cpl. John Michaels, in Moscow, Penn.CreditNiko J. Kallianiotis for The New York Times

In late October 1968, I came home from Vietnam. With six months to go before the end of my four-year enlistment, I was assigned to the Marine Corps Supply Depot, Philadelphia. In late December I sat at a desk addressing envelopes when my sergeant walked over to tell me to report to the first sergeant’s office.

I looked at him.

He said, “You got orders.”

“Orders for what?”

“Body escort. The first sergeant will give you the details. Why don’t you get down there and see him.”

It wasn’t a suggestion. I was heading for the door when he said, “You can refuse the orders.”

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Tactical air defense controllers and air control electronics operators with Marine Air Control Squadron 24, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing run simulations on the Common Aviation Command and Control System (CAC2S) Phase 1 on Sept. 12, 2013. US Marine Corps photo.

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. – In a field at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point sits three sets of gear: a tent full of computers connected to a Humvee outside, a truck bearing a tall radio antenna, and a spinning radar sitting atop a hill.

These three systems represent the next generation of Marine Corps air command and control capabilities: connecting Marine Corps units and their operating picture with the Navy’s, sending and receiving data in real time, and detecting more types of incoming threats to Marine Corps ground units.

In total, according to some of the first Marines in the force to work with this new trio of systems, the combination of the radar, command and control system and network will help the Marines be more mobile, save lives on the ground, and extend the range of Navy land-attack weapons at sea.

 

 

 

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An ex-Marine who took his semper fi spirit to Syria to fight alongside a US-backed Kurdish militia group in the battle against ISIS has been killed.

David Taylor, a 25-year-old Floridian, had kept mum about his plans to join the People’s Protection Units, or YPG, after he was discharged in 2016 — telling only one pal, whom he swore to secrecy.

His own father only found out when his son arrived in Syria last spring and began training.

“I got an email and he said, ‘Pops, don’t worry. I’m with the YPG,’” David Taylor Sr. told the Associated Press from his West Virginia home. “He said, ‘I’m doing the right thing. It’s for their freedom.’

 

 

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The Marine Corps is testing rank insignia chevrons made out of cloth instead of metal for enlisted Marines, said the Corps’ top enlisted leader.

Marine Commandant Gen. Robert Neller has expressed an interest in how ranks are displayed visually on enlisted Marines’ uniforms, said Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Ronald Green.

“That’s why the commandant is looking at cloth chevrons,” Green told Marine Corps Times on Monday. “A lot of young Marines say: ‘Hey, can we do something to make the rank insignia more visible?’ So we’re taking a look at that.”

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