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A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Station St. Petersburg, Florida, is shown Monday, July 31, 2017 aboard the boat with two fishermen at Station St. Petersburg, Florida. The two brothers were rescued by the boat crew after their 17-foot boat sunk in Tampa Bay. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Melo)

FISHERMEN TRANSPORTED TO STATION, NO INJURIES

TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA – The Coast Guard recently rescued two fishermen Monday who were clinging to a rear range light in the Tampa Bay.

Rescued were Tung Le, 47, and Thanh Le, 41, brothers from Tampa.

Watchstanders from Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg received a 911 transfer call from Pinellas County Dispatch reporting two men were in the water clinging to the Tampa Bay Cut Delta Channel outbound rear range light.

The men stated they were fishing aboard their 17-foot boat in the bay when their engine died and the boat began taking on water.

While the brothers worked on the inoperable pump, the boat drifted and struck the range light. The brothers tied their boat off to the range light; they were forced to cling to the navigation aid and call for help when the boat sank.

“It was dying down when we were out there and finally everything started going wrong,” said Thanh Le. “The waves started hitting while we were trying to fix the bilge in the back and when we turned around we were drifting out.”

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A barge carrying anhydrous ammonia and diesel fuel caught on fire Thursday afternoon (Aug. 3, 2017), and was then set adrift off the Mississippi coast after a tugboat crew was unable to extinguish the flames, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. (U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Davis)

A barge carrying anhydrous ammonia and diesel fuel caught on fire Thursday afternoon (Aug. 3), and was then set adrift off the Mississippi coast after a tugboat crew was unable to extinguish the flames, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

No injuries were reported in the blaze, which was extinguished by Thursday evening, the Coast Guard said in a news release. About 6 p.m., the barge was floating 4-and-a-half miles south of Pass Christian, Miss., and drifting in an easterly direction.

A 100-foot sheen was reportedly emanating from the barge, which was carrying 2,500 tons anhydrous ammonia and 800 gallons of diesel fuel, according to the Coast Guard.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, anhydrous ammonia is a colorless gas used as an agricultural fertilizer and industrial refrigerant. With “pungent, suffocating fumes,” the gas can be “immediately dangerous to life or health” when handled improperly, the CDC says.

“Safety of the public and first responders is our number one priority as we respond to this incident,” Capt. Malcolm McLellan, Sector Commander of Sector Mobile, said in a news release.

Coast Guard watchstanders in Mobile, Ala., were alerted about 1:20 p.m. that the barge, being pushed by the tugboat Kathryn T. Devall, was ablaze. The tug’s crew could not extinguish the fire and released the barge from the tug about two miles west of Cat Island, Miss., officials said.

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NEWBURYPORT – This community has been designated a Coast Guard City, and on Thursday waves of curious visitors boarded service vessels at the Station Merrimack River open house to learn more about the equipment and technique of sea rescue that starts on local docks.

“We have 400 to 500 visitors on an open house day like this,” said Rich Rubino, a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a tour guide. “These boats are so different than the pleasure craft in the harbor, and of course, they have a different mission. There is a lot to learn and people are interested.”

Coast Guard officials permitted boarding on two 47-foot motor lifeboats. They are built to withstand waves up to 20 feet high; if the surf is larger, even the Coast Guard stands down.

The vessels are self-righting, meaning that if a boat rolls over in high seas, it will return to an upright position in eight seconds or less.

Each vessel has two 425-horsepower diesel engines, which are designed to operate when the craft is upside down if it flips.

“You don’t want the engine failing at a moment like that,” Rubino said.

Each motor lifeboat can cruise at 20 knots and has a top speed of about 24 knots.

A crew is generally made up of four, although more can be aboard if needed.

The vessel can carry 35 passengers in an emergency but on Thursday, even a tour group of 15 in a watertight cabin made the space seemed cramped.

“If there is a time when there are 35 here, it probably means a rescue,” said Rubino, a local resident whose daughter is in the Coast Guard. “If that happened, it would be crowded but you would be very glad that you were aboard the boat and not in the ocean.”

Newburyport is the birthplace of the Coast Guard, in part because the first “revenue cutter,” the Massachusetts, was built here.

Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, seeking revenue in 1790 for the new nation, ordered that 10 small ships called revenue cutters be built and dispatched in Atlantic harbors. Armed with cannons and federal authority, they would approach arriving ships to collect tariffs.

The Massachusetts and the Pickering were built here in the 1790s, and after much organizational evolution, the revenue service was merged with the lighthouse service and lifesaving service to become the U.S. Coast Guard in 1915.

Coast Guard authorities say the first station in the community was built on Plum Island in about 1873. Its buildings were relocated and rebuilt several times because of beach erosion, and through the 1960s, a Coast Guard station functioned on Plum Island near the mouth of the Merrimack.

That structure is now used by the Coast Guard Auxiliary and serves as a voting location for part of Ward 1.

In 1973, a century after the first structure on Plum Island, Station Merrimack River on Water Street was opened and dedicated on Aug. 4.

The date of Aug. 4, 1790, marks the official birthday of the Coast Guard.

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Admiral reached out to all 13 members of the Coastguard who identify as transgender

The chief of the US Coast Guard has said he “will not break faith” with transgender personnel after Donald Trump said they would be banned from serving in the military.

The US Coast Guard commandant, Admiral Paul Zukunft, offered support for transgender.

Speaking at a Center for Strategic and International Studies event in Washington, Admiral Zukunf said the first thing the Coast Guard did when it saw the US President announce the ban on Twitter was reach out to all 13 members who identify as transgender.

He did not say what the Coast Guard, which is part of the Department of Homeland Security, would do if the ban was implemented.

Admiral Zukunft said he contacted Lieutenant Taylor Miller, the first openly transitioning officer in the Coast Guard, who was featured in a Washington Post article.

“If you read that story, Taylor’s family has disowned her. … And I told Taylor: ‘I will not turn my back,'” The Hill reported him as saying.

Addressing the service members, he added: “We have made an investment in you, and you have made an investment in the Coast Guard and I will not break the faith.

“And so that was the commitment to our people right now. Very small numbers, but all of them are doing meaningful Coast Guard work today.”

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(BIVN) – Several large cracks portend a possible collapse of the lava delta at the Kamokuna ocean entry, warn scientists with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, prompting an advisory from the U.S. Coast Guard as well.

The cracks on the delta are running parallel to the coastline and span the width of the delta. These cracks increase the likelihood of a large delta collapse, USGS reports.

The scientists also recorded a time-lapse sequence showing subsidence of the lava delta at the ocean entry. The video, posted above, “shows a sequence of 8 time-lapse photos – one photo per day from July 6 to July 13, 2017,” USGS says. “The sequence shows the front of the delta subsiding, and cracks running parallel to the coast widening, over the 8-day time period. The short movie is looped numerous times to help viewers detect these subtle changes in the delta, which are reminders that lava deltas are unstable features that can collapse without warning.”

Two lava delta collapses have already occurred at the Kamokuna ocean entry; one on Dec. 31, 2016, and another on May 3, 2017.

The cracking delta instigated a reminder from the U.S. Coast Guard, which stated in a media release that it continues to enforce “the temporary Kamokuna Lava Delta Safety Zone for the navigable waters surrounding the Kilauea Volcano active lava flow entry into the Pacific Ocean.”

“For mariners without prior limited entry approval, the safety zone encompases all waters extending 300 meters (984 feet) in all directions around the entry of the lava flow into the ocean and remains in effect,” said Lt. Cmdr. John Bannon, Coast Guard Sector Honolulu, waterways management lead. “All waterway users should be aware of this new delta formation, the potential for a significant collapse with little or no warning and the natural hazards associated with such an event.”

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PANAMA CITY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – According to the U.S. Coast Guard, Coast Guard officials medevaced a 51-year-old man from a fishing vessel nine nautical miles south of St. Andrews Bay Saturday.

Coast Guard officials said Coast Guard Sector Mobile watchstanders received a notification at 9:15 a.m. of a man aboard a 50-foot charter boat reportedly suffering from heart attack-like symptoms.

According to the Coast Guard, watchstanders directed the launch of a Coast Guard Station Panama City 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew.

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LONG BEACH, WA (KPTV) –

The U.S. Coast Guard rescued a man who escaped from his sinking yacht off the Washington coast.

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Astoria was notified of the call for help about nine miles off Leadbetter Point State Park north of Long Beach at 10:17 p.m. Friday.

The 67-year-old mariner reported that his 45-foot pleasure yacht, Sea Crest, was taking on water after hitting an unknown object. The man hit his head during the collision and reported that he may have lost consciousness, but he wasn’t sure for how long.

When he woke up, water was coming into the deck scuppers.

Nobody else was on the yacht, which was in auto pilot at the time of the collision.

The mariner abandoned ship into his 17-foot yacht tender with a life jacket, survival suit and flares.

Shortly after notifying the Coast Guard, the man reported losing sight of the ship and hearing sounds that indicated it might have sunk.

The man was safely hoisted up by the Coast Guard helicopter crew at 11:06 p.m. After landing back at the air station, the man was checked out, but refused further medical treatment.

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As the Trump administration threatened hefty budget cuts for the U.S. Coast Guard, the military service was spending more than $6.6 million protecting the president’s waterfront Mar-a-Lago Club during his seven weekend trips there this spring, documents show.

The Coast Guard deployed cutters, patrol boats, helicopters and anti-terror specialists from across the country to safeguard the luxury Palm Beach, Florida, estate.

The deployments came as Coast Guard leaders, bracing for possible budget cuts, have argued that the cash-strapped service has made painful sacrifices — letting some illegal drug shipments go and delaying certain repairs to its fleet.

The records, released Thursday to The Washington Post in response to a Freedom of Information Act request, offer a glimpse into the intricate costs and demands for a military force tasked with defending the president during his frequent getaways to his private businesses.

They also highlight how taxpayers have helped finance the unusually elaborate lifestyle of Trump and his family in ways that can also benefit his company. In this case, Mar-a-Lago, which Trump has dubbed a “Winter White House,” is also a for-profit, members-only club.

The Coast Guard has provided security for past presidents alongside the U.S. Secret Service, including guarding former President Barack Obama during trips such as his annual family vacations to Hawaii, but officials could not immediately provide estimates for those costs.

When Obama spent a weekend in South Florida in 2013, the Coast Guard spent about $586,000 to cover patrol, travel and lodging costs, according to a Government Accountability Office report last year.

The spending at Mar-a-Lago, which comes to close to $1 million for each trip, appears to collide with the president’s pledges of trimming government costs.

The Coast Guard spent more than $17.8 million on presidential security costs between October and March, offering air and waterside patrols for high-level events during the Obama and Trump administrations. That cost was up from $15.1 million in the same period ending in March 2016, and $10.7 million for the period ending in March 2015, Coast Guard records show.

The Coast Guard is brought in to protect Trump at official events as well as recreational excursions, including patrolling the Potomac River when the president plays golf at his Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia.

The Secret Service requested Coast Guard protection for Trump’s Mar-a-Lago visits, which are classified as “national special security events,” Coast Guard officials said. The club has represented an expensive challenge for the service, which patrols the airspace above the estate as well as its two coastlines along the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway.

Two teenagers were winched to safety after being cut off by the tide in conditions so extreme that lifeguards were unable to reach them.

Rescuers were called out just after 4pm yesterday to an area of the coast between Greenaway and Polzeath.

Polzeath Coastguard

The winchman is lowered down the cliff.

There were reports that two teenagers had been cut off by the tide and Rock RNLI, lifeguards from Polzeath, Boscastle Coastguard Team and a rescue helicopter were summoned to the scene.

Rock Lifeboat and Polzeath lifeguards were unable to reach the casualties due to the weather conditions so a full rope rescue system was set up and the team prepared to lower a cliff technician down to the pair.

Polzeath Coastguard

The rescue team, pictured at the top of the cliff

However, a coastguard rescue helicopter was also at the scene and a winchman was lowered who was able to pluck the two teenagers to safety.

Polzeath Coastguard

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As the Trump administration threatened hefty budget cuts for the U.S. Coast Guard, the military service was spending more than $6.6 million protecting the president’s waterfront Mar-a-Lago Club during his seven weekend trips there this spring, documents show.

The Coast Guard deployed cutters, patrol boats, helicopters and anti-terror specialists from across the country to safeguard the luxury Palm Beach, Florida, estate.

The deployments came as Coast Guard leaders, bracing for possible budget cuts, have argued that the cash-strapped service has made painful sacrifices — letting some illegal drug shipments go and delaying certain repairs to its fleet.

The records, released Thursday to The Washington Post in response to a Freedom of Information Act request, offer a glimpse into the intricate costs and demands for a military force tasked with defending the president during his frequent getaways to his private businesses.

They also highlight how taxpayers have helped finance the unusually elaborate lifestyle of Trump and his family in ways that can also benefit his company. In this case, Mar-a-Lago, which Trump has dubbed a “Winter White House,” is also a for-profit, members-only club.

The Coast Guard has provided security for past presidents alongside the U.S. Secret Service, including guarding former President Barack Obama during trips such as his annual family vacations to Hawaii, but officials could not immediately provide estimates for those costs.

When Obama spent a weekend in South Florida in 2013, the Coast Guard spent about $586,000 to cover patrol, travel and lodging costs, according to a Government Accountability Office report last year.

Read more…

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