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Upgraded radar, weapons and cybersecurity technology are being engineered into the F-22 to enable the stealth fighter to counter attacks from emerging future enemy threats, dogfights successfully against Russian and Chinese 5th-generation stealth fighters, and fly successfully well into the 2060s.

For example, newer F-22s have a technology called Synthetic Aperture Radar, or SAR, which uses electromagnetic signals or “pings” to deliver a picture or rendering of the terrain below, allow for better target identification.

The SAR technology sends a ping to the ground and then analyzes the return signal to calculate the contours, distance and characteristics of the ground below. SAR enables pilots to dynamically survey target areas and adjust to new targets in flight. Previously, F-22s would take off with pre-determined target, F-22 pilots told Scout Warrior.

 

 

 

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‘For this kind of surveillance plane, it’s the most modern that we have,’ says Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana

MANILA, Philippines – It’s the “first of its kind” in the Philippine Air Force – aircraft that will soon patrol different parts of the country, including war-torn Marawi City, the West Philippine Sea, and Benham Rise.

The Philippine Air Force on Thursday, July 27, officially received two Cessna C-208B Grand Caravan aircraft from the United States as part of a grant to the Philippines.

The two planes, which have intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities, are worth roughly P1.67 billion or around $30 million, according to US Ambassador to the Philippines Sung Kim.

 

 

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Chief Master Sgt. Robert Bean, an Air Force pararescue jumper, demonstrates how the Battlefield Assisted Trauma Distributed Observation Kit can be worn on the wrist, providing awareness of the health status of multiple patients. Developing BATDOK required Air Force medical researchers to embed with pararescue jumpers on live missions to ensure the tool met the rigorous standards required by combat Airmen. (Courtesy photo)

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AFNS)– Imagine the chaos and challenge of delivering life-saving care in a battlefield environment. That’s what faced a group of Air Force researchers as they developed a new electronic patient monitoring tool for use on the battlefield. Overcoming this challenge required an integrated development process, where researchers left the lab and embedded on missions with medical Airmen.

The technology they developed, the Battlefield Assisted Trauma Distributed Observation Kit, or BATDOK, is software that can run on a smartphone or other mobile device, and draws patient information from a wide variety of commercially available, U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved sensors. It lets medics monitor multiple patients in the field, seeing vital information and managing multiple patients in a chaotic environment.

The integrated development process was critical to making BATDOK a tool that seamlessly integrates mobile capabilities for Airmen in the field, said Dr. Gregory Burnett, from the 711th Human Performance Wing’s Airman Systems Directorate in the Warfighter Interface Division. Dr. Burnett managed the development of BATDOK for the Air Force.

“BATDOK is a multi-patient, point of injury, casualty tool that assists our human operators and improves care,” said Burnett. “It can be a real-time health status monitoring for multiple patients, a documentation tool, a user-definable medical library, a portal to integrate patient data into their electronic health records, and finally it is interoperable with battlefield digital situation awareness maps, which helps identify the exact location of casualties.”

Dr. Burnett’s background in computer engineering, with an emphasis in embedded electronics and mobile interfaces helped the Air Force Research Laboratory development team design the look and feel of BATDOK. However, more intimate knowledge was needed for the tool to be most useful for operators in the field.

 

 

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In a threat environment that is rapidly expanding into the electromagnetic spectrum, the KC-46A Pegasus has just successfully proved its immunity to electromagnetic pulse weapons. Eliminating a major operational risk and an obstacle on the way to product delivery, according to Boeing executives.

“The KC-46A tanker is protected by various hardening and shielding technologies designed into the aircraft to negate any effects on the aircraft. This successful effort retires one of the key risks on the program,” said Mike Gibbons, Vice President and Manager of the Boeing KC-46A program.

Positioned on top of a special landing pad, the KC-46A was hit with electromagnetic pulses, which are induced by sending an electrical current through a large coil to create a momentary magnetic field. Boeing reports that the KC-46A was also tested using electromagnetic pulses directed at the aircraft while it was airborne.

 

 

 

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Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson speaks during an Air Force Association event in Arlington, Va. August 1, 2017. Wilson highlighted the aircraft flying in the Light Attack Experimentation campaign, progress in the establishment of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Space Operations directorate, and the next step in Air Force innovation. (U.S. Air Force photo/Wayne A. Clark)

ARLINGTON, VA. — While speaking at an Air Force Association event in Arlington, Va., Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson highlighted the four aircraft that Air Force pilots will fly through a range of combat mission scenarios in the Light Attack Experimentation Campaign at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico next week.

The Air Force will assess Sierra Nevada Corp. and Embraer’s A-29 Super Tucano, Air Tractor Inc. and L3 Platform Integration Division’s AT-802L Longsword, as well as Textron Aviation’s Scorpion jet and AT-6 Wolverine turboprop, during the live-fly experiment.

“The light attack aircraft experiment took five months from conception to aircraft delivery,” said Wilson. “We will learn some things, including how fast and cost-effectively we can get capabilities to the warfighter.”

 

 

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The 36th Fighting Squadron “Flying Fiends”, belonging to the 51st Fighting Wing, is one of the U.S. Air Force squadrons located closer to North Korea: based at Osan Air Base, South Korea, about 50 miles south of the Demilitarized Zone that separates North and South Korea, the squadron and its F-16s are on constant alert status.

“Being a Flying Fiend means to be a part of a legacy of more than 100 years of combat aviation. We’ve been involved in every major conflict from the 20th century: from World War I to WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and about 36 years of alert readiness on the Korean peninsula,” said Capt. Wayne Mowery, 36th Fighter Squadron jet fighter pilot.

On Jul. 21, 2017, one week before North Korea tested a Hwasong-14 ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile), the 36th FS unveiled a newly refurbished F-16 Fighting Falcon during a Tail Flash ceremony at Osan AB.

The F-16 was brought back to life by members from the 51st Maintenance Squadron Corrosion Control Shop repairing and repainting its tail.

“Basically this was a clean slate, we had to sand everything down on this plane, all the old paint and [install] a new tail flash that was custom made,” said U.S. Air Force Senior Airman William Williams, 51st MXS sheet metal and corrosion technician in a public release.

 

 

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While much progress has been made by Air Force and Pentagon scientists thus far, much work needs to be done before hypersonic air vehicles and weapons are technologically ready to be operational in combat circumstances.

The Air Force is aggressively accelerating its hypersonic weapons development effort, following findings from a recent service report identifying Russian and Chinese ongoing hypersonic weapons testing.

A recent Air Force Studies Board report identified that the U.S. is not alone in its quest for this increased speed, an Air Force statement said.

The statement went on to say that China and Russia are already flight testing hypersonic weapons, and several other countries have shown interest in pursuing many of the underlying technologies for hypersonic flight.

“We must push the boundaries of technology in every area,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein said in a statement. “Our adversaries aren’t standing still. They are looking for every advantage they can get.”

 

 

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The 183-foot-long North American XB-70 Valkyrie towers over other X-planes in the fourth building of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Aircraft from the Presidential, Research and Development, Space and Global Reach Galleries are inside the hangar. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

A $40.8 million hangar expansion of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force housing presidential aircraft and one-of-a-kind jets and spacecraft has earned “gold” for going green.

 

 

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The Singapore Air Force F15 aircrafts could possibly be based at Ohakea Air Force Base if the proposal is accepted.

Singapore pilots will wing their way to Ohakea for training as top-leval talks continue about the Asian nation setting up a permanent Air Force base in New Zealand.

It was announced at the Ohakea Air Tattoo in February that Singapore officials were in talks with the New Zealand Government about the idea.

A New Zealand Defence Force spokesman said at the end of August, F16 fighter aircraft would visit Ohakea for three weeks for flying training.

Should Ohakea become a permanent training base for the Singapore Air Foce, an F15 fighter would be based there.

 

 

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U.S. Air Force Col. Christopher Amrhein receives his first salute as the commander of the 100th Air Refueling Wing July 21, 2017, during the change of command ceremony on RAF Mildenhall. Photo: US Air Force/Senior Airman Justine Rho

The squadrons which form the US Air Force’s 100th Air Refueling Wing gathered at RAF Mildenhall to welcome a new commander.

Col Christopher Amrhein, who most recently served as vice wing commander of the 18th Wing, Kadena Air Base, Japan, took over command from Col Thomas D Torkelson.

During the ceremony the guidon, a military standard, was passed from Col Torkelson to Col Amrhein to symbolise the relinquishing of control.

Lt. Gen. Richard Clark, 3rd Air Force commander and presiding officer, said Col Amrhein and his wife Cathy are the perfect command team, ready to lead the men and women of the 100th ARW to the next level.

“Chris, your amazing career has prepared you well for this opportunity, and I want to be the first to congratulate you as you assume command of the storied and stellar 100th Air Refueling Wing,” he said.

 

 

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