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JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. — Anyone tracking flight paths as the sun set Wednesday over Washington state would have seen a major aircraft movement: military cargo planes, refueling tankers and fighter jets flying in formation.

The unique sight was part of Air Mobility Command’s inaugural Mobility Guardian — a two-week training exercise incorporating more than 3,000 service members, 40 U.S. aircraft and 20 international partners.

Taking part in the exercise were airmen, soldiers and naval aviators, along with service members from more than 20 countries — with half participating in the training scenarios and half observing.

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Senior Airman Eric Contreras, a 86th Communications Squadron systems acquisitions technician, connects wires to new computers for imaging on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Aug. 3, 2017. The National Security Agency has directed all of the Department of Defense to make the transition to Microsoft Windows 10. The NSA directive puts all branches of the military on the same operating system for the first time ever. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Savannah L. Waters)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany (AFNS) — Every day the U.S. Air Force rallies in defense against enemy forces wishing to inflict harm, whether it’s through physical harm or via cyberattacks. As the advancement of technology expands, cyber security is more important than ever.

The National Security Agency has directed all of the Department of Defense to make the transition to Microsoft Windows 10. The NSA directive puts all branches of the military on the same operating system for the first time ever.

“The Air Force and DOD are always moving forward in cyber security … to protect us against cyberattacks and provide a better and more protected network,” said Staff Sgt. Christian Valdivia, the 86th Communications Squadron systems acquisitions supervisor.

Keeping up with the civilian enterprise has its challenges as the military fights for optimum security and for smooth communications between departments to de-conflict software issues.

“In the past, we couldn’t put Air Force on Army equipment down-range or vice versa due to software conflict,” Valdivia said. “The only solution then was re-imaging the computer and wiping them completely, but with Windows 10, we won’t have to do that.”

The 86th CS supports more than 24,000 network devices in the Client Systems Center, and they have a March 2018 deadline to ensure every computer in U.S. Air Forces in Europe migrates to Windows 10.

 

 

 

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WASHINGTON — The Pentagon has signed off on a new policy that will allow military bases to shoot down private or commercial drones that are deemed a threat, Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. Jeff Davis said Monday.

The policy itself is classified and was transmitted to the services in July, Davis said. Broadly, it outlines the rules of engagement for a base when a private or commercial drone is encroaching upon its airspace.

On Friday, unclassified guidance was sent to each of the services on how to communicate the new policy to local communities.

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A proposal in Congress would create the first new uniformed service in 70 years, but it faces opposition from the Pentagon.

The U.S. military hasn’t added a new uniformed service in 70 years, when the Air Force was created in the aftermath of World War II.

If Congress gets its way, that will soon change.

In a bipartisan vote last month, the House of Representatives approved legislation that would direct the Defense Department to build a new “space corps” within the Air Force. Its backers blame the Pentagon for failing to prioritize space security in recent years, a lapse that has allowed rivals like Russia and China the opportunity to catch up to U.S. superiority. The proposal’s fate now rests in the Senate, but its most powerful foe is the military itself, which says Congress should simply send more resources rather than force it to undertake a bureaucratic overhaul during a time of war.

 

 

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NEW DELHI: Indian Air Force fighter jets will be able to effectively tackle Chinese Air Force fighters over Tibet in the event of hostilities between the two countries. A new yet-to-be-released document, “The Dragon’s Claws: Assessing China’s PLAAF Today” makes the point that the IAF has significant operational advantages over the Chinese Air Force in operations in the Tibetan Autonomous Region which lies to the North of the Line of Actual Control between the two countries.

Written by Squadron Leader Sameer Joshi, a former Indian Air Force Mirage 2000 fighter pilot and produced by Vayu Aerospace, the document is the first comprehensive Indian assessment of the air power balance between India and China since the crisis in the Doklam plateau broke out last month.

 

 

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WASHINGTON — Four New York lawmakers got a firsthand glimpse of a historical White House staff shake-up on what was supposed to be a fun trip on Air Force One with President Trump.

But when GOP Reps. Dan Donovan, Peter King, Chris Collins and Lee Zeldin boarded the presidential plane July 28 to Long Island, there was already tension in the air.

Fox News was flashing on TVs in the conference room area of the plane where the four sat with chief of staff Reince Priebus and communications director Anthony Scaramucci. The rivals were at opposite ends and not speaking to each other as newscasters recounted the vile names Scaramucci had called Priebus in a tirade with a reporter.

 

 

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“Used” might be more economical than “new” when it comes to buying cars, but what about when it comes to presidential aircraft?

With the Trump administration looking to save some cash on the purchase of a new Air Force One, the U.S. Air Force and Boeing struck a deal late Friday on a pair of Boeing 787-8s that were originally built for a now-bankrupt Russian airline.

Transaero was Russia’s second-largest airline until it went bankrupt in 2015. Competitor Aeroflot absorbed much of the defunct airline’s equipment but declined to pick up the $1.5 billion sticker price for the planes. Boeing has been paying to park them in the aircraft boneyard in the Mojave Desert.

“The planes have always been owned by Boeing and in Boeing’s possession,” said Caroline Hutcheson, spokesperson for the Seattle-based aircraft giant, in an exclusive interview with Rare.

The pair of planes is not even “used,” exactly, aviation and U.S. Air Force acquisition expert Loren Thompson told Rare. “They’ve been flown exactly twice: once to make sure everything was working right and once to take them to the boneyard,” Thompson said. They’ve been stored in a “like-new” state ever since, he added. And they’re certainly an upgrade from the 747-200s that have been transporting U.S. presidents since the 1990s.

 

 

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Upgraded radar, weapons and cybersecurity technology are being engineered into the F-22 to enable the stealth fighter to counter attacks from emerging future enemy threats, dogfights successfully against Russian and Chinese 5th-generation stealth fighters, and fly successfully well into the 2060s.

For example, newer F-22s have a technology called Synthetic Aperture Radar, or SAR, which uses electromagnetic signals or “pings” to deliver a picture or rendering of the terrain below, allow for better target identification.

The SAR technology sends a ping to the ground and then analyzes the return signal to calculate the contours, distance and characteristics of the ground below. SAR enables pilots to dynamically survey target areas and adjust to new targets in flight. Previously, F-22s would take off with pre-determined target, F-22 pilots told Scout Warrior.

 

 

 

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‘For this kind of surveillance plane, it’s the most modern that we have,’ says Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana

MANILA, Philippines – It’s the “first of its kind” in the Philippine Air Force – aircraft that will soon patrol different parts of the country, including war-torn Marawi City, the West Philippine Sea, and Benham Rise.

The Philippine Air Force on Thursday, July 27, officially received two Cessna C-208B Grand Caravan aircraft from the United States as part of a grant to the Philippines.

The two planes, which have intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities, are worth roughly P1.67 billion or around $30 million, according to US Ambassador to the Philippines Sung Kim.

 

 

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Chief Master Sgt. Robert Bean, an Air Force pararescue jumper, demonstrates how the Battlefield Assisted Trauma Distributed Observation Kit can be worn on the wrist, providing awareness of the health status of multiple patients. Developing BATDOK required Air Force medical researchers to embed with pararescue jumpers on live missions to ensure the tool met the rigorous standards required by combat Airmen. (Courtesy photo)

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AFNS)– Imagine the chaos and challenge of delivering life-saving care in a battlefield environment. That’s what faced a group of Air Force researchers as they developed a new electronic patient monitoring tool for use on the battlefield. Overcoming this challenge required an integrated development process, where researchers left the lab and embedded on missions with medical Airmen.

The technology they developed, the Battlefield Assisted Trauma Distributed Observation Kit, or BATDOK, is software that can run on a smartphone or other mobile device, and draws patient information from a wide variety of commercially available, U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved sensors. It lets medics monitor multiple patients in the field, seeing vital information and managing multiple patients in a chaotic environment.

The integrated development process was critical to making BATDOK a tool that seamlessly integrates mobile capabilities for Airmen in the field, said Dr. Gregory Burnett, from the 711th Human Performance Wing’s Airman Systems Directorate in the Warfighter Interface Division. Dr. Burnett managed the development of BATDOK for the Air Force.

“BATDOK is a multi-patient, point of injury, casualty tool that assists our human operators and improves care,” said Burnett. “It can be a real-time health status monitoring for multiple patients, a documentation tool, a user-definable medical library, a portal to integrate patient data into their electronic health records, and finally it is interoperable with battlefield digital situation awareness maps, which helps identify the exact location of casualties.”

Dr. Burnett’s background in computer engineering, with an emphasis in embedded electronics and mobile interfaces helped the Air Force Research Laboratory development team design the look and feel of BATDOK. However, more intimate knowledge was needed for the tool to be most useful for operators in the field.

 

 

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